Preparing for Pollinators

Posted by & filed under Beneficial insects, Butterfly Gardens, Design, Insects, Native Plants, Naturalizing, Pollinator Gardens, Sustainability, Sustainable Landscaping, Uncategorized.

  With all the Buzz about pollinators in the news lately (sorry, just couldn’t resist it), I thought that this might be a good time to think about adding a pollinator garden to the landscape.         For the past few years, flower and gardening magazines, websites and even home improvement television shows… Read more »

“Bee-Friending” Insect Populations

Posted by & filed under Bees, Beneficial insects, Insects, landscape management, Native Grasses, Native Groundcover, Native Plants, Native Shrubs, Native Trees, Naturalizing, Nectar Plants, Predatory Insects, Sustainability, Sustainable Landscaping, Uncategorized, Urban Landscaping.

  Insect populations around the world are rapidly declining. Within the next 20 years, 40% of the earth’s insect species may be extinct and within 100 years insects could disappear completely.   Insects are the foundation of the planet’s ecosystems. When just one type of insect disappears, dozens of other species, including humans, are directly… Read more »

Plant A Patch: American holly (Ilex opaca)

Posted by & filed under American holly, Broadleaf evergreen, Holiday Decor, Native Trees, Shrubs & Trees, Uncategorized, Winter Decorations, Winter Landscaping.

    The perfect plant for adding dramatic color to the winter landscape, American holly is a classic choice! This slow growing, broadleaf evergreen with glossy green leaves and clusters of bright red berries throughout the winter is the epitome of the traditional Christmas decoration. More than just a decoration, American Holly can serve as… Read more »

Plant A Grove — Staghorn Sumac (Rhus typhina)

Posted by & filed under Fall gardens, Native Plants, Native Shrubs, Naturalizing, Shrubs & Trees, Staghorn Sumac, Uncategorized, Urban Landscaping.

      If you’ve taken a drive in the countryside lately, you’ve probably seen a striking shrub flaunting yellow, orange and red foliage all on the same bush. Staghorn sumac, named for the velvety appearance of its stunning young branchlets, has a strong, open, spreading growth habit, reaching 15 to 25 feet. It naturalizes… Read more »