Declining Insects — Declining World: Part 2 Causes of Insect Decline

Posted by & filed under Beneficial insects, Causes of Insect Decline, Insects, Uncategorized

Insect populations around the world are rapidly declining. Within the next 20 years, 40% of the earth’s insect species may be extinct and within 100 years insects could disappear completely.  (Blog intro: Declining Insects —  Declining World, Feb. 20, 2019)   As usual, once I start thinking about a topic, it pops up everywhere; declining …

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Plant A Patch: Switch grass (Panicum virgatum)

Posted by & filed under Clay Soil, Fall gardens, Fall planting, Native Grasses, Native Plants, Naturalizing, Rain Garden Plants, Rain Gardens, Rainscaping, Switch grass, Uncategorized, Winter Landscaping

  Reminiscent of the days of the tallgrass prairie, switch grass, with its upright, columnar shape can be a striking stand alone focal point, a massed anchor for a border, or a backdrop for a rain garden. Reaching up to 6 feet in height when in bloom, switch grass is easily grown in moist, sandy …

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Plant A Patch: Big Bluestem (Andropogon gerardii)

Posted by & filed under Big Bluestem, Drought tolerant plants, Fall Blooming Plants, Native Grasses, Native Plants, Naturalizing, Sustainable Landscaping, Uncategorized, Winter Landscaping

  Native grasses add a dramatic flair to the winter garden and Big Bluestem is one of the best. Six to eight feet taller at maturity, Big Bluestem is perfect for naturalizing, as a focal point or in the back of the border, Big Bluestem is easy to grow in almost any sunny location with …

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Declining Insects — Declining World

Posted by & filed under Bees, Beneficial insects, Benefits of Nature, ecosystems, Insects, Uncategorized

  Insect populations around the world are rapidly declining. Within the next 20 years, 40% of the earth’s insect species may be extinct and within 100 years insects could disappear completely.  (Worldwide decline of the entomofauna: A review of its drivers Biological Conservation, Apr. 2019).         If your initial response to these …

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Plant A Grove: American highbush-cranberry (Viburnum trilobum)

Posted by & filed under American highbush-cranberry, Birds, Native Shrubs, Naturalizing, Sustainability, Sustainable Landscaping, Uncategorized, Winter Landscaping

          Spectacular as a stand alone shrub or massed as a backdrop to a border, the American highbush-cranberry gives four seasons of interest to the garden. This large deciduous shrub (8+ feet) prefers full sun, but will also thrive in partial shade as long as it is planted in evenly moist, …

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Feel the Need for Green? Plant Suggestions from Embassy

Posted by & filed under Houseplants, Indoor gardens, Uncategorized

With so many different varieties of houseplants available today, a little guidance can sometimes help consumers select the best plant for their conditions. The staff at Embassy has shared a list of some of their favorite houseplants– both familiar and unfamiliar–  along with a few notes on care. We hope this list inspires you to …

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Plant A Grove: Silky Dogwood (Cornus amomum)

Posted by & filed under Native Plants, Native Shrubs, Naturalizing, Rain Garden Plants, Rain Gardens, Rainscaping, Shade-loving plants, Shrubs & Trees, Silky Dogwood, Uncategorized, Winter Landscaping

  If you are looking for a medium-sized, hardy shrub with winter interest for the back of the rain garden, Silky Dogwood could be your answer. This native is definitely a four season star with creamy blooms in the spring, berries in the summer, reddish-purple fall foliage and red/brown stems in winter. It forms a …

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Feel the Need for Green: Caring for Your Houseplants

Posted by & filed under Houseplant Care, Houseplants, Uncategorized

  Writing about houseplants the last few weeks has made me want to spruce up my office with some new plants. The ones I have are solid, dependable varieties that do well in low light conditions and benign neglect, but they don’t particularly inspire me anymore. It’s time to try something new.     Saturday, …

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